Hiphop Archive & Research Institute Fellowship

About the HARI Fellowship Program
"Build. Respect. Represent."

The Fellowship program is at the heart of the activities and mission of the Hiphop Archive and Research Institute (HARI). HARI Fellowships are intended for women and men who demonstrate exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts in connection with Hiphop. HARI offers yearlong or semester fellowships at Harvard University to further the development of Hiphop scholars and artists by assisting fellow’s engagement in research or creative projects in any of the arts. All Fellows must be in attendance. Consistent with the motto of HARI to build, respect and represent, we seek projects from scholars and artists designed to build on the rich and complex Hiphop tradition, to respect the tradition through historically grounded and contextualized critical insights, and most importantly, to represent one’s own creative and/or intellectually rigorous contribution to Hiphop and the discourse through personal projects. Personal projects of Fellows may include manuscript projects, performance pieces, album work, curriculum planning, primary archival research, and exhibition preparation, among others.

What is a Fellowship?

A Fellowship is an award in recognition of research, works and ideas. It usually refers to nationally competitive grants, scholarships, and similar funding opportunities. Typically, fellowships fund research, or teaching in the U.S. or abroad. There are many different Fellowships at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at the Hutchins Center. The Nasir Jones and HARI Fellowships fund research, writing projects and arts projects. We also support specific research and creative projects that may have more of a clinical, practice oriented or organizational focus. We consider Fellowships to be an investment in the future. Our Fellowships include a monetary award and office space and support for one’s work. As part of the fellowship award, all Fellows must present their work and attend presentations on Wednesdays of each week and be available to share ideas and conversation with other Fellows throughout the week.

The Nasir Jones Hiphop Fellowship

The Nasir Jones Fellowship is the result of a generous gift in the name of Nas, the critically acclaimed artist known for his lyrical skill, social analysis and commitment. His 1994 debut album, Illmatic, Nasir Jones received top ratings from industry tastemakers and the emergent millions of hiphop followers. Nas began to change the music industry and the mindset of hiphop fans with his clear context and informed rhetoric that places listeners in the middle of his complex stories. His self-awareness and introspection are enlightening and prove to be a necessary vulnerability that provides gravitas to his ironclad verses. Through his creative skill and commitment, Nas has helped usher in an original form of hiphop debate and analysis that reflects on and represents urban youth angst and conflict as well as intelligence, confidence and ambition. This Fellowship honors his work while supporting the work of others. The Nasir Jones Hiphop Archive Fellowship will provide those selected with a chance to show that “education is real power” by building off of their achievements in an effort to make advancements in hiphop scholarship. It joins the Hutchins Fellowship, the W.E.B. Du Bois Fellowship, the College Board Fellowship and the Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellowship in awarding support to innovative scholars and artists from throughout the world.

The Hiphop Archive and Research Institute Fellowship

The Hiphop Archive and Research Institute Fellowship provides a residential appointment at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research. This resident appointment offers considerable benefits, including the following: office space, use of a research assistant and full access to the extensive research and library resources of Harvard University. HARI Fellowships fund research, writing projects and arts projects. We also support specific research and creative projects that may include performance pieces, album work, curriculum planning, primary archival research, and exhibition preparation, among others.

Who Should Apply for this Fellowship?

The Nas and HARI Fellowships are resident fellowships. This means you must be available to participate in Fellowship weekly activities. Participation is a requirement. The Fellowship does not support travel to research sites, travel at home or abroad and activities that prevent Fellows from participating in activities.

Fellows work in a range of fields and interests that are important to hiphop. These include art, music, Afro-Latin American research, design, education, African studies, the African diaspora, African American studies, gender and sexuality, health, literature, and creative writing.

Most applicants are scholars who are completing a work or using the Harvard University resources for research. Some are artists and performers who are completing projects or developing new projects. A residential appointment at the Institute offers considerable benefits to any fellow. We provide office space and a computer, use of a research assistant, and Fellows have full access to the extensive research and library resources of Harvard University and the HARI archives and resources.

The application must include: 3 letters of reference, a resume or CV, a detailed project description, and a writing sample.

What are the costs of the Fellowship?

Grants and funding of Fellowships vary widely. Many Fellows have outside funding and do not receive monetary grants with their Fellowship. When required, Nas and HARI Fellows receive a maximum of $50,000 for the academic year.